Home PoliticsPolitical Protests Hong Kong’s security law has chilled dissent, but there are ways to keep the spirit of opposition alive

Hong Kong’s security law has chilled dissent, but there are ways to keep the spirit of opposition alive

by admin

Since the passing of the National Security Law (NSL), the Hong Kong government has used it not only to prosecute and deter protesters and activists, but to generate a diffused sense of fear and anxiety among people uncertain whether they are next in line to be arrested.

Over just the last few weeks, student activist Tony Chung was charged under the NSL and denied bail while others were arrested; RTHK producer Bao Choy was arrested for investigating police misconduct in Yuen Long; eight pro-democracy lawmakers were arrested; and police launched a multi-platform national security hotline for people to report on one another. It received over 2,500 tips within hours. The chilling effect of the NSL is palpable in people’s everyday lives. 

Photo: Candice Chau/HKFP.

It is no surprise that the government targets youth activists, journalists, and lawmakers as they are key actors who motivate the public to investigate and deliberate on political truths and policies. By prosecuting them, the government is intentionally generating a diffused sense of fear and disempowerment among Hongkongers in general, in which everyone worries about their own safety and the safety of loved ones.

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